Latest Comments

In response to: Grain boundaries between crystals in big ice

Comment from: [Member]

Hi Karel,
About your 1st question:
Does all clear ice (not slush) separate or split as vertical candles or pencils?

I have not seen polycrystalline ice that splits apart like this. Sea ice might, but I have not played around with sea ice. The reason sea ice might do this is that the salt in the water does not enter the ice, and tends to collect in long vertical channels called brine pockets.

About your 2nd question:
Or is there a difference in small grains and large grains?

The grains will depend on the ice history and the way it originally formed. Often, researchers just look at slices of the ice and thus get knowledge only of a cross-section. It would be interesting to know the 3-dimensional structure of the grains.

About your 3rd question:
Most ice formed from freezing has air bubbles. And there can be a lot of stress in the ice around the bubble. So this might lead to grains. I don’t know any more about it though.

(Sorry about the delay in this reply. I was having some trouble with the system.)

07/12/19 @ 11:13

In response to: Grain boundaries between crystals in big ice

Comment from: Karel [Visitor]
Karel

Does all clear ice (not slush) sepatate or split as vertical candles or pencils? Or is there a difference in small grains and large grains? And what about air bubbles?

07/02/19 @ 17:21

In response to: Hair Ice on Wood and Pavement

Comment from: [Member]

Hi Madison.

Hair ice forms like needle ice in the ground: water from inside flows to the surface and freezes. I tried to explain this above and below the diagram–let me know what aspect of the explanation is unclear.

The reason that the hairs are thinner is thought to be due to the thinner channels of water in the plants.

And the reason the hairs don’t clump into a solid mass, like clumped spaghetti is not clear. Some researchers recently argued that a fungus in the wood keeps the hairs from clumping.

Jon

01/02/19 @ 19:11

In response to: Hair Ice on Wood and Pavement

Comment from: Madison Hancock [Visitor]  
Madison Hancock

But why does it happen

01/02/19 @ 16:50

In response to: The Crunchy Puddle Puzzle

Comment from: [Member]

Nice to hear, David.

I suppose many have wondered, but only for a minute.

The frozen puddles have other interesting features, and thus more things yet to wonder about. It never ends.

About that last question and mystery in the last photo, I think I now have the solution.

01/23/18 @ 16:04

In response to: The Crunchy Puddle Puzzle

Comment from: David S. [Visitor]
David S.

Thank you for answering this puzzle for me! As a kid, I too loved breaking the hollow ice on puddles and always wondered how they formed that way.

01/09/18 @ 13:49

In response to: Slush Fingering and Other Pond Patterns

Comment from: [Member]

Thanks Ray.

I’ve never heard of Zooniverse, but I look forward to checking out your link.

06/21/17 @ 16:16

In response to: Slush Fingering and Other Pond Patterns

Comment from: Ray Perry [Visitor]
Ray Perry

Hi,
I came across similar dendritic patterns on Eskimo Lakes ice whilst browsing Google Maps https://www.google.de/maps/@69.509159,-131.539675,971m/data=!3m1!1e3 and have started a discussion on Zooniverse Planet Four terrains https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/mschwamb/planet-four-terrains/talk/9/192678?comment=329756&page=1 . I would appreciate your comments.

02/25/17 @ 09:04

In response to: Black Ice

Comment from: [Member]

Wow, Dennis, those are fantastic patterns and great photos – thanks for the link!

Many people seem to think that the curvy ice patterns only form on glass. But it only requires a thin film of water. This is why I call it “film frost". In addition to the cases of concrete and plastic shown above, I’ve also seen it on wood. I don’t recall ever seeing it on rock, or if I have, never as startling as the formations you photographed.

Jon

03/01/13 @ 18:44

In response to: Black Ice

Comment from: dennis [Visitor]
dennis

just posted some photos of black ice on my flickr site. so far, you are the only site i have found that has similar shots of this phenomenon!
go to my site and check out the patterns that showed up on our flat rocks at our home in ct. i have never seen this before in my life! so far i think that people who see this think it is a hoax or something!
http://www.flickr.com/photos/schaut/
thanks, dennis

03/01/13 @ 16:36

In response to: An Ice Vase Sprouts From a Bathtub

Comment from: [Member]

Well, thanks Tom.
The ice wall sounds like a drainage feature, related to the “crunchy puddle” phenomenon (as you mention), and the Jan 27, 2013 entry on puddles.

Clearly, there is a lot more to observe and describe about frozen puddles! I’d really like to see a photo of this one you mentioned.

Jon

03/01/13 @ 08:49

In response to: An Ice Vase Sprouts From a Bathtub

Comment from: Tom Todd [Visitor]
Tom Todd

Well done, Jon! I found (and extensively photographed, if you want any example) a beautiful ice wall in a Swedish forest puddle. It was about 3cm high, sharp at the top, and about 100cm long, with a tringular cross-section which stood clear at the 1cm thick base from the main frozen surface, indicating water level changes. (Nearby there were many “crunchy puddles” as you call them.) The formation curved around the inside of the puddle to form a large ellipse, and was bafffling until I read your blog on ice vases.
Regards,
TNT

02/28/13 @ 14:42

In response to: What makes the thick curvy lines in frozen puddles?

Comment from: [Member]

Hi Andy,
I bet you miss the ice and snow sometimes! Unfortunately, we haven’t had a frost day in weeks, and we haven’t had much sun either, just the usual NW winter rain. In Japan, we would often have both frost and sun.

Nice to hear about the grandson. Would like to see you guys together, reading about snow or otherwise.

Jon


02/05/13 @ 22:35

In response to: What makes the thick curvy lines in frozen puddles?

Comment from: Andy [Visitor]
Andy

Hello Jon
I just started reading this blog it is very cool. I sent a copy of your book to my grandson Oren Nelson and am looking forward to reading it with him.
I hope all is well with you and your family
Regards
Andy

02/05/13 @ 08:58

In response to: Hair Ice on Wood and Pavement

Comment from: [Member]

Glad to hear that you see hair ice a lot. Tell me if you also see ribbon ice. I’ll try to post a photo of ribbon ice that a friend took.

I gave a Science Cafe talk recently about ice formations, and one fellow mentioned seeing ribbon ice from a mushroom. So, keep an eye out for mushrooms on those hair-ice days.

Jon

01/28/13 @ 11:49

In response to: Hair Ice on Wood and Pavement

Comment from: Ellen Madsen [Visitor]
Ellen Madsen

Thanks so much. I’ve been seen hair-ice for years on alder at Mclane Creek Nature Trail & calling it hoar frost. Have to educate the other regulars about it.

It’s been a great year for hair-ice out there!
E

01/28/13 @ 00:55

In response to: Eyes and Dry Moats

Comment from: art [Visitor]
art

This is truly great stuff, Jon! And its so much more erudite, more informative than what I do. If I get into that topic again, I HAVE to reference your work here!

01/22/13 @ 07:11

In response to: Black Ice

Comment from: [Member]

Ah, I understand the difficulty! It is hard to picture these three-dimensional patterns and shapes, and even harder to see how they form. Some good drawings would really help.

I think you are referring to the triangular features that appear in the first puddle photo of the next blog posting “The Crunch Puddle Puzzle". But it sounds like the features you saw did not have completely drained water, and as a result, the bars of ice that formed the perimeter of the triangles were a little higher than the interior region of the triangle. Perhaps they were also a little higher than the region exterior to the bars.

Once, I saw 1/2″ deep holes in the top surface of an outdoor bathtub. I still find that puzzling. But I will try to post a few explanatory drawings in the next few days.

Jon

01/15/13 @ 10:57

In response to: Black Ice

Comment from: bex [Visitor]  
bex

I was searching for info on why I am seeing unique (to me) ice formations on puddles and ponds in Mendocino County, N. California. I didn’t absorb the above…it’s late and I read it fast. I’m also old and my brain is toast so I will have to read it more slowly. The formations I have seen are triangles that are frozen on the surface (horizontal) of the water; around edges of triangles are “frames” of ice 1/4 to 1/2 inch wide which appear to rise a bit above the surface of the triangles. I asked my husband, a science guy, who said he thot it had to do with wind as the ice is forming. There hasn’t been any wind!

01/15/13 @ 03:33

In response to: BEDFISH: Revising an old Idea for Classifying Surface Ice Forms

Comment from: esther a.a [Visitor]
esther a.a

i love the way they explain everthing

09/29/12 @ 21:17