Latest Comments

In response to: Story of Snow - Simplified Chinese edition

Comment from: [Member]
Jon

Hi Mark,

If you ever get an image of the Russian and Korean editions, please post!

It is nice to see these other languages and have a reminder that the book is spreading…

Jon

11/22/16 @ 21:03

In response to: Story of Snow - Simplified Chinese edition

Comment from: [Member]

You are right! I grabbed the Japanese cover by mistake. Corrected now.

05/11/16 @ 15:26

In response to: Story of Snow - Simplified Chinese edition

Comment from: [Member]
Jon

Hi Mark,

Fantastic news – I didn’t know that we could speak Chinese!

Do you have a different image of the cover?
The image you show instead shows the Japanese edition. At least, it has some Japanese characters that the Chinese don’t use.

05/10/16 @ 13:06

In response to: First Snow Crystal Photos of 2010 / 11

Comment from: Maggie Bresz [Visitor]
Maggie Bresz

Your pictures are wonderful,Mark.It’s a delight to see them.

03/12/11 @ 11:11

In response to: Groundhog Day Blizzard - 2011

Comment from: [Member]

Thanks, Jon - that top one does look like a turtle, lol… I didn’t see any columns or needles - just lots of broken and mangled bits, and a few small plates and sectored plates…

Mark

02/03/11 @ 21:12

In response to: Groundhog Day Blizzard - 2011

Comment from: [Member]
Jon

That first one looks like at turtle, and the other two do have some interesting interior lines. Nice selection!

Did you see any columns or needles?

Jon

02/03/11 @ 10:43

In response to: More Snowflake Photographs with Classifications

Comment from: [Member]

Your interpretations of how to classify the snow crystals make a lot of sense, Jon. And thanks for the kind words about the first image in the post –the snow can fall in beautiful crystals when conditions are right, but more often than not I see rime cover and fluffy white, opaque crystals. The clean and translucent ones are a rarity.

- Mark

02/20/10 @ 17:55

In response to: More Snowflake Photographs with Classifications

Comment from: [Member]
Jon

I have a hard time taking my eyes off the first crystal - such a clean and sharp image!

So, I came up with a few different ones than you. One difficulty is in choosing the underlying pattern. For example, is the underlying pattern in #1 dendritic or stellar? You thought the former, I thought the latter.And then there is a grey zone between ordinary dendrite and fern-like. Another difficulty is distinguishing sectorlike from plate extension.

As I read things, a dendrite should have some significant sidebranches, whereas a stellar should have no major sidebranch.

About sectors, I’ve never seen anyone really clarify the meaning, so I’ve taken it to mean segments that have almost a pie-slice shape. I didn’t see this in #1, so I voted for P2a, stellar with plates at the end. It is true that the plates have some small sidebranches at the ends, but they seem like small additions at the end of growth so I ignored them. (Stunning though!)

On #2, I also went with plates at the end, calling it P2c - dendrite with plate ends.

On 3,4,5&6, I got the same as you: R1d, P4a, P1e, and P1e.

#7 seemed close to fern-like, so I voted for P1f. But it is a tough call.

#8 is a toss. I figured it could be either R2b or R1d. I leaned towards the former though, and you picked the latter.

#9 & 10 I got the same as you: R2b.

Interesting view about the classification with all the rime. They must explain the choices in their 1966 article. I have the article somewhere in my collection, but can’t find it.

I suppose though that they wanted the classification to give useful knowledge about the cloud conditions. Rime is a very useful observation because it tells us that the cloud had a lot of liquid water (i.e., many drops). The underlying shape is important too, but harder to interpret, even now. Presently, we don’t have enough knowledge to be able to infer the humidity and temperature except in special cases, like the fern-like form. For example, broad-branches can form at two temperature zones.

Jon


02/18/10 @ 19:02

In response to: Three From This Evening

Comment from: [Member]

Thanks, Jon - I have more to post and will see if I can Classify them…

- Mark

02/17/10 @ 21:30

In response to: Three From This Evening

Comment from: [Member]
Jon

That first one is hard to classify. I suppose it fits best into P2g - plate with dendrite extensions. Very pretty and very symmetric.

The second one - a nice rimed stellar R1d, I like it. I’ve never noticed how a little rime can make a crystal look even nicer. It must be the skills of the photographer!

And the third one is another R1d - a rimed stellar. It is quite different from the second one though - so it seems like we need some intermediate classes.

Jon

02/16/10 @ 23:20

In response to: Feedback from the Blogosphere

Comment from: Abby [Visitor]
Abby

Thanks for the link, Mark. I loved the book! Now, whenever it starts snowing, I look at the tiny flakes and imagine what they look like up close. (I haven’t managed to catch any to actually view up close… yet!)

01/06/10 @ 15:22

In response to: Happy New Year 2010

Comment from: [Member]
Jon

The center part of this crystal is amazing - the most beautiful I’ve seen.

01/04/10 @ 20:58

In response to: Not the Worst Winter Ever

Comment from: [Member]

Wow - you live in a really cool neighborhood, Jon! I doubt that a bull has stepped foot anywhere near my house for well over 100 years.

12/30/09 @ 21:54

In response to: Not the Worst Winter Ever

Comment from: [Member]
Jon

Beautiful photos and nice essay.
About making observations, even though I live in a suburban area, I find that if I go outside for a stroll (always with my camera), I always find something.
Yesterday there wasn’t much ice that I could find, but on my way back I discovered a black bull grazing in someones (slightly overgrown) parking lot. I never would have expected it.

12/30/09 @ 00:04

In response to: Snow Crystals!

Comment from: [Member]
Jon

Wow Mark, those are fantastic.
The top one, which as you said, looks like two crystals, might be a case where even the normally ’stunted’ level of the crystal developed significant branches. I haven’t really studied the levels on many crystals, so I don’t know how rare this is. It is hard to discern the second level on the bottom crystal.

12/28/09 @ 06:10