Category: "Crystal growth, general"

The Curious World of Ice and Snow: Part 1 of 3

February 4th, 2020
In 2012, I gave a "science cafe" talk with a local series sponsored by the Pacific Science Center, KCTS public television, and Science on Tap. The title was "The curious world of ice and snow". The location was a bar in Kirkland, but open to all ages.… more »

Some "Inexplicable" Snow-crystal Features: Applications of Lateral Growth

January 29th, 2020
Last October, I gave a talk at the University of Washington about our recent experiments and ideas about snow-crystal growth. My pitch was general and short, as few folks work in this area and I'd hate to bore them with a long lecture. So, I was… more »

The Growing Icicle's Hollow Tip

January 17th, 2020
If you inspect the tip of a growing icicle, you might be surprised to find it hollow. Skeptical? Well, if you think the conditions suitable for icicles outside, put a toothpick in your pocket and go outside. Then when you see a likely candidate, poke… more »

Martini Hoar (raise a tiny glass?)

October 19th, 2019
The hoar-frost crystal shoots up like a thin, solid straw, then suddenly opens up into a cup-like shape. I have seen it often enough to give it a name: "martini hoar". The cup can be weirdly segmented and polyhedral, but it nevertheless widens suddenly.… more »

Thinking Laterally in Crystal Growth…and in Science Publishing

October 10th, 2019
After a long period of work (on and off), we have an accepted paper on the corner pockets we discovered (see here). But during the writing stage, I thought about collecting earlier ideas I had developed during my correspondence with Prof. Akira… more »

The fun of shooting down your own theories

April 10th, 2014
Thomas H. Huxley once wrote the famous line: The great tragedy of Science: the slaying of a beautiful hypothesis by an ugly fact. Great man and a catchy phrase, but perhaps he was being a bit overdramatic. To me, the slaying of a “hypothesis” (i.e., pet… more »